Describing himself as an amateur computer historian, Savetz says that he’s watched “tens of tens of thousands of pages of computer magazines, newsletters, and catalogs” over time, and also co-hosts ANTIC: The Atari 8-Bit Podcast, conducting hundreds of interviews with the folks involved in the corporation.

Picture: Kevin Savetz

Image: Kevin Savetz


Picture: Kevin Savetz

138 pages! https://t.co/a1xpteHERt pic.twitter.com/UbV6zKcZEm
Savetz told The Verge that the catalogue was”a part of a large bunch of old computers that I purchased from a local computer refurb/recycling organization. I had never seen a catalog like it, and could not find much reference to it online, so it was an easy choice to scan it.” He is since auctioned off the catalogue, with the proceeds going to RAICES.
An amateur pc historian has discovered a cool piece of technology paraphernalia: NeXT’s Fall 1989 catalogue. Kevin Savetz recently scanned the whole 138-page publication, and posted the files to Archive.org.

Navigating through the catalogue is an interesting glimpse into NeXT’s software, user interface, peripherals, and much more. What is striking about the software is how familiar it seems to Apple users. NeXT, Savetz states, was a particularly interesting company, since it”came at a critical time, and although it wasn’t a commercial success,” its interface and hardware ultimately led to the contemporary goods that Apple now ships. “Plus, the machines were just so cool looking.”
— Kevin Savetz (@KevinSavetz) July 4, 2019

Picture: Kevin Savetz
NeXT was the firm that Steve Jobs founded in 1985 after he was fired by Apple. The company designed computer workstations and lasted throughout 1997, when Jobs was rehired in Apple.